Déc 292018
 

Following previous article, I did some more googling around windows raw sockets feature and found this interesting article.

And in particular this part when weighting the pros and cons of using windows raw sockets :

Since raw sockets are built into the kernel TCP/IP implementation, there is no need for additional kernel-mode code (such as NDIS filter drivers or WFP callout drivers). There are however a number of drawbacks compared to the first two techniques:

· No filtering in kernel-mode is possible – all packets are delivered to the user-mode application (which has performance implications).

· There is no visibility of how many packets are lost/dropped as a result of insufficient buffering.

· The packets are first time-stamped when processed by a user-mode application, which might be some time after they “could have been” time-stamped by filter/callout driver kernel-mode code running in a DPC (Deferred Procedure Call).

· There is no guarantee of the order in which the kernel adds packets to the raw socket. Monitoring the kernel activity with the “Microsoft-Windows-TCPIP” and “Microsoft-Windows-Winsock-AFD” providers indicates that the outbound response to an inbound packet is often copied to the raw socket before the inbound packet.

Poster un Commentaire

avatar
  S’abonner  
Notifier de